Get PDF On the Threshold: Writing Toward the Year 2000

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online On the Threshold: Writing Toward the Year 2000 file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with On the Threshold: Writing Toward the Year 2000 book. Happy reading On the Threshold: Writing Toward the Year 2000 Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF On the Threshold: Writing Toward the Year 2000 at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF On the Threshold: Writing Toward the Year 2000 Pocket Guide.
Buried under the surface of her life, is her longing to write, and her deep feelings On the Threshold: Writing Toward the Year , with Foxglove Collective (T.
Table of contents



When you see a night illumined by an unknown light, know that this is the great sign given you by God that he is about to punish the world for its crimes, by means of war, famine, and persecutions of the Church and of the Holy Father. To prevent this, I shall come to ask for the consecration of Russia to my Immaculate Heart, and the Communion of reparation on the First Saturdays.

If my requests are heeded, Russia will be converted, and there will be peace; if not, she will spread her errors throughout the world, causing wars and persecutions of the Church. The good will be martyred; the Holy Father will have much to suffer; various nations will be annihilated.

In the end, my Immaculate Heart will triumph. The third part of the secret revealed at the Cova da Iria-Fatima, on 13 July I write in obedience to you, my God, who command me to do so through his Excellency the Bishop of Leiria and through your Most Holy Mother and mine. After the two parts which I have already explained, at the left of Our Lady and a little above, we saw an Angel with a flaming sword in his left hand; flashing, it gave out flames that looked as though they would set the world on fire; but they died out in contact with the splendour that Our Lady radiated towards him from her right hand: And we saw in an immense light that is God: Other Bishops, Priests, men and women Religious going up a steep mountain, at the top of which there was a big Cross of rough-hewn trunks as of a cork-tree with the bark; before reaching there the Holy Father passed through a big city half in ruins and half trembling with halting step, afflicted with pain and sorrow, he prayed for the souls of the corpses he met on his way; having reached the top of the mountain, on his knees at the foot of the big Cross he was killed by a group of soldiers who fired bullets and arrows at him, and in the same way there died one after another the other Bishops, Priests, men and women Religious, and various lay people of different ranks and positions.

Beneath the two arms of the Cross there were two Angels each with a crystal aspersorium in his hand, in which they gathered up the blood of the Martyrs and with it sprinkled the souls that were making their way to God.

Poet, editor

In the great joy of Easter, I greet you with the words the Risen Jesus spoke to the disciples: I will be happy to be able to meet you on the long-awaited day of the Beatification of Francisco and Jacinta, which, please God, I will celebrate on 13 May of this year. Since on that day there will be time only for a brief greeting and not a conversation, I am sending His Excellency Archbishop Tarcisio Bertone, Secretary of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, to speak with you.

Sister Maria Lucia, you may speak openly and candidly to Archbishop Bertone, who will report your answers directly to me. May Mary, Mother of pilgrim humanity, keep us always united to Jesus, her beloved Son and our brother, the Lord of life and glory. Sister Lucia was lucid and at ease; she was very happy that the Holy Father was going to Fatima for the Beatification of Francisco and Jacinta, something she had looked forward to for a long time. The Bishop of Leiria-Fatima read the autograph letter of the Holy Father, which explained the reasons for the visit.

Sister Lucia felt honoured by this and reread the letter herself, contemplating it in own her hands. She said that she was prepared to answer all questions frankly. At this point, Archbishop Bertone presented two envelopes to her: Immediately, touching it with her fingers, she said: The original text, in Portuguese, was read and interpreted with the help of the Bishop of Leiria-Fatima. She repeated her conviction that the vision of Fatima concerns above all the struggle of atheistic Communism against the Church and against Christians, and describes the terrible sufferings of the victims of the faith in the twentieth century.

She recalled that the three children were very sad about the suffering of the Pope, and that Jacinta kept saying: Archbishop Bertone therefore asked: Was it Our Lady who fixed that date? Now it can be better understood. I wrote down what I saw; however it was not for me to interpret it, but for the Pope. Finally, mention was made of the unpublished manuscript which Sister Lucia has prepared as a reply to the many letters that come from Marian devotees and from pilgrims. The work is called Os apelos da Mensagem de Fatima, and it gathers together in the style of catechesis and exhortation thoughts and reflections which express Sister Lucia's feelings and her clear and unaffected spirituality.

She was asked if she would be happy to have it published, and she replied: Sister Lucia wants to present the text for ecclesiastical approval, and she hopes that what she has written will help to guide men and women of good will along the path that leads to God, the final goal of every human longing. The conversation ends with an exchange of rosaries. Sister Lucia is given a rosary sent by the Holy Father, and she in turn offers a number of rosaries made by herself.


  • .
  • .
  • Secrets of a New York Medical Malpractice & Personal Injury Attorney.
  • The Message of Fatima?
  • ?
  • Die Entwicklung des Wappens der Firma und Familie Zanders, Bergisch Gladbach: Von der Hausmarke zum Warenzeichen (German Edition)!
  • Hope from the Harvest Fields: One Farmer’s Journey through God’s Word.

The meeting concludes with the blessing imparted in the name of the Holy Father. At the conclusion of this solemn celebration, I feel bound to offer our beloved Holy Father Pope John Paul II, on behalf of all present, heartfelt good wishes for his approaching 80th Birthday and to thank him for his vital pastoral ministry for the good of all God's Holy Church; we present the heartfelt wishes of the whole Church.

On this solemn occasion of his visit to Fatima, His Holiness has directed me to make an announcement to you.

Eminem - Stan (Short Version) ft. Dido

Nevertheless he also wishes his pilgrimage to be a renewed gesture of gratitude to Our Lady for her protection during these years of his papacy. That text contains a prophetic vision similar to those found in Sacred Scripture, which do not describe photographically the details of future events, but synthesize and compress against a single background facts which extend through time in an unspecified succession and duration.

As a result, the text must be interpreted in a symbolic key. The vision of Fatima concerns above all the war waged by atheistic systems against the Church and Christians, and it describes the immense suffering endured by the witnesses of the faith in the last century of the second millennium. It is an interminable Way of the Cross led by the Popes of the twentieth century.

As he makes his way with great difficulty towards the Cross amid the corpses of those who were martyred Bishops, priests, men and women Religious and many lay people , he too falls to the ground, apparently dead, under a hail of gunfire. On the occasion of a visit to Rome by the then Bishop of Leiria-Fatima, the Pope decided to give him the bullet which had remained in the jeep after the assassination attempt, so that it might be kept in the shrine.

By the Bishop's decision, the bullet was later set in the crown of the statue of Our Lady of Fatima.

The successive events of led, both in the Soviet Union and in a number of countries of Eastern Europe, to the fall of the Communist regimes which promoted atheism. In other parts of the world, however, attacks against the Church and against Christians, with the burden of suffering they bring, tragically continue. Brothers and sisters, let us thank Our Lady of Fatima for her protection. To her maternal intercession let us entrust the Church of the Third Millennium. Sub tuum praesidium confugimus, Sancta Dei Genetrix! No great mystery is revealed; nor is the future unveiled.

We see the Church of the martyrs of the century which has just passed represented in a scene described in a language which is symbolic and not easy to decipher. Is this what the Mother of the Lord wished to communicate to Christianity and to humanity at a time of great difficulty and distress? Is it of any help to us at the beginning of the new millennium? Or are these only projections of the inner world of children, brought up in a climate of profound piety but shaken at the same time by the tempests which threatened their own time?

How should we understand the vision? What are we to make of it? Public Revelation and private revelations — their theological status. Before attempting an interpretation, the main lines of which can be found in the statement read by Cardinal Sodano on 13 May of this year at the end of the Mass celebrated by the Holy Father in Fatima, there is a need for some basic clarification of the way in which, according to Church teaching, phenomena such as Fatima are to be understood within the life of faith.

The two realities differ not only in degree but also in essence. It is not a matter therefore of intellectual communication, but of a life-giving process in which God comes to meet man. At the same time this process naturally produces data pertaining to the mind and to the understanding of the mystery of God. It is a process which involves man in his entirety and therefore reason as well, but not reason alone.

Because God is one, history, which he shares with humanity, is also one. It is valid for all time, and it has reached its fulfilment in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. In Christ, God has said everything, that is, he has revealed himself completely, and therefore Revelation came to an end with the fulfilment of the mystery of Christ as enunciated in the New Testament. Because the single Revelation of God addressed to all peoples comes to completion with Christ and the witness borne to him in the books of the New Testament, the Church is tied to this unique event of sacred history and to the word of the Bible, which guarantees and interprets it.

But this does not mean that the Church can now look only to the past and that she is condemned to sterile repetition. The Catechism of the Catholic Church says in this regard: The way in which the Church is bound to both the uniqueness of the event and progress in understanding it is very well illustrated in the farewell discourse of the Lord when, taking leave of his disciples, he says: When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth; for he will not speak on his own authority On the one hand, the Spirit acts as a guide who discloses a knowledge previously unreachable because the premise was missing—this is the boundless breadth and depth of Christian faith.

In this regard, the Catechism cites profound words of Pope Gregory the Great: This is the category to which we must assign the message of Fatima. In this respect, let us listen once again to the Catechism of the Catholic Church: This clarifies two things: The authority of private revelations is essentially different from that of the definitive public Revelation. The latter demands faith; in it in fact God himself speaks to us through human words and the mediation of the living community of the Church. Faith in God and in his word is different from any other human faith, trust or opinion.

The certainty that it is God who is speaking gives me the assurance that I am in touch with truth itself.

It gives me a certitude which is beyond verification by any human way of knowing. It is the certitude upon which I build my life and to which I entrust myself in dying. Private revelation is a help to this faith, and shows its credibility precisely by leading me back to the definitive public Revelation. In this regard, Cardinal Prospero Lambertini, the future Pope Benedict XIV, says in his classic treatise, which later became normative for beatifications and canonizations: The Flemish theologian E.

Dhanis, an eminent scholar in this field, states succinctly that ecclesiastical approval of a private revelation has three elements: Such a message can be a genuine help in understanding the Gospel and living it better at a particular moment in time; therefore it should not be disregarded. It is a help which is offered, but which one is not obliged to use. The criterion for the truth and value of a private revelation is therefore its orientation to Christ himself.

When it leads us away from him, when it becomes independent of him or even presents itself as another and better plan of salvation, more important than the Gospel, then it certainly does not come from the Holy Spirit, who guides us more deeply into the Gospel and not away from it. This does not mean that a private revelation will not offer new emphases or give rise to new devotional forms, or deepen and spread older forms. But in all of this there must be a nurturing of faith, hope and love, which are the unchanging path to salvation for everyone.

We might add that private revelations often spring from popular piety and leave their stamp on it, giving it a new impulse and opening the way for new forms of it. Nor does this exclude that they will have an effect even on the liturgy, as we see for instance in the feasts of Corpus Christi and of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. From one point of view, the relationship between Revelation and private revelations appears in the relationship between the liturgy and popular piety: Popular piety is a sign that the faith is spreading its roots into the heart of a people in such a way that it reaches into daily life.

While it must always take its lead and direction from the liturgy, it in turn enriches the faith by involving the heart. We have thus moved from the somewhat negative clarifications, initially needed, to a positive definition of private revelations. How can they be classified correctly in relation to Scripture?

To which theological category do they belong? The oldest letter of Saint Paul which has been preserved, perhaps the oldest of the New Testament texts, the First Letter to the Thessalonians, seems to me to point the way. In every age the Church has received the charism of prophecy, which must be scrutinized but not scorned. On this point, it should be kept in mind that prophecy in the biblical sense does not mean to predict the future but to explain the will of God for the present, and therefore show the right path to take for the future.

A person who foretells what is going to happen responds to the curiosity of the mind, which wants to draw back the veil on the future. The prophet speaks to the blindness of will and of reason, and declares the will of God as an indication and demand for the present time. In this case, prediction of the future is of secondary importance. What is essential is the actualization of the definitive Revelation, which concerns me at the deepest level. The prophetic word is a warning or a consolation, or both together.

Books - Elizabeth Greene Writer Poet Editor Author, Kingston Ontario

To interpret the signs of the times in the light of faith means to recognize the presence of Christ in every age. In the private revelations approved by the Church—and therefore also in Fatima—this is the point: In these reflections we have sought so far to identify the theological status of private revelations.


  • Behind East Asian Growth: The Political and Social Foundations of Prosperity.
  • Information Technology Encyclopedia and Acronyms: A Comprehensive Acronym Dictionary and Illustrated Encyclopedia.
  • Do No Evil;
  • !
  • Effie Two-Five.
  • Ally (The Wesshar Wars).
  • .

Before undertaking an interpretation of the message of Fatima, we must still attempt briefly to offer some clarification of their anthropological psychological character. It is clear that in the visions of Lourdes, Fatima and other places it is not a question of normal exterior perception of the senses: Therefore we are dealing with the middle category, interior perception.

For the visionary, this perception certainly has the force of a presence, equivalent for that person to an external manifestation to the senses. Interior vision does not mean fantasy, which would be no more than an expression of the subjective imagination. It means rather that the soul is touched by something real, even if beyond the senses. This is why there is a need for an interior vigilance of the heart, which is usually precluded by the intense pressure of external reality and of the images and thoughts which fill the soul.

The person is led beyond pure exteriority and is touched by deeper dimensions of reality, which become visible to him. Perhaps this explains why children tend to be the ones to receive these apparitions: But it also has its limitations. Even in exterior vision the subjective element is always present. We do not see the pure object, but it comes to us through the filter of our senses, which carry out a work of translation. This is still more evident in the case of interior vision, especially when it involves realities which in themselves transcend our horizon. The subject, the visionary, is still more powerfully involved.

He sees insofar as he is able, in the modes of representation and consciousness available to him. In the case of interior vision, the process of translation is even more extensive than in exterior vision, for the subject shares in an essential way in the formation of the image of what appears. He can arrive at the image only within the bounds of his capacities and possibilities. This can be demonstrated in all the great visions of the saints; and naturally it is also true of the visions of the children at Fatima.

The images described by them are by no means a simple expression of their fantasy, but the result of a real perception of a higher and interior origin. But neither should they be thought of as if for a moment the veil of the other world were drawn back, with heaven appearing in its pure essence, as one day we hope to see it in our definitive union with God.

Rather the images are, in a manner of speaking, a synthesis of the impulse coming from on high and the capacity to receive this impulse in the visionaries, that is, the children. For this reason, the figurative language of the visions is symbolic. In this regard, Cardinal Sodano stated: This compression of time and place in a single image is typical of such visions, which for the most part can be deciphered only in retrospect. Not every element of the vision has to have a specific historical sense. It is the vision as a whole that matters, and the details must be understood on the basis of the images taken in their entirety.

I would just like to recall briefly the most significant point. For one terrible moment, the children were given a vision of hell. And now they are told why they have been exposed to this moment: The words of the First Letter of Peter come to mind: To reach this goal, the way indicated —surprisingly for people from the Anglo-Saxon and German cultural world—is devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.


  • ;
  • .
  • ;
  • !
  • The Meaning of Careful.

A brief comment may suffice to explain this. According to Matthew 5: A collection of poems inspired by Kingston's streets and haunted houses and a journey through the poet's past as she invokes and lays to rest some of her old ghosts. This book, drawn from an eight-part reading series Elizabeth Greene organized in the winter and spring of , includes Kingston poets ranging from nationally known to lesser known, from poets in their twenties to others in their seventies and eighties.

We Who Can Fly: A tribute to Adele Wiseman, winner of the Governor-General's Award for her first novel The Sacrifice , this book documents Adele's gift for friendship and her contribution to the literary community during her years as Director of the Writing Program at Banff. The Window of Dreams: Thirty stories and poems for children written by Canadian authors, including fantasy, lyric poetry, animal stories, nonsense verse, and realistic fiction.

The Iron Shoes Hidden Brook, The Book of the New with Danielle Gugler. Writing Toward the Year