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I stumbled upon Good Kids, a novel described as a romantic comedy. I had thought, why not sway away from my strictly romantic novel choices and venture off.
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Polarhog takes his grumpy friend, Barry the Bird, for a walk. The walk and surprise at the end will entertain your kids — and you, too. Perfect for growing readers and reminds me a little of the beloved Calvin and Hobbes. Claudette is a dragon slaying, mischievous girl who tricks her little brother and her best friend a princess into questing to kill the dragon. This is a lovely book for early readers and readers who might be new to English.

My 9-year old has read this book at least 3 times already. Even though she gets her dream to work in the faire as a squire, she also just wants to be like the other girls at her school, too. Her journey is painful and honest as she figures out who she wants to be. Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani age 8 — Pashmina is about a girl finding her place in the world.

She travels to India to meet her extended family and finds answers about the magical shawl her mother owns. This is a lovely coming of age middle grade graphic novel conveyed in incredible, irresistible art. Space Dumplins by Craig Thompson ages 8 — Enchanting illustrations, warm-hearted characters, random Bible story references Jonah and the whale , and an action-packed plot make this a stand-out sci-fi graphic novel.

What else does this book have? It all starts after the siblings and their mom move into a new, creepy inherited house after losing their father. They discover a magical amulet who warns the kid of the danger. Soon the siblings will be on an epic adventure to save their mom in an underground world of elves, demons, robots, and talking animals. King of the Gods. This Rapunzel uses her long braids to lasso the bad guys in the wild west. Gorgeous artwork sets the tone for an otherworldly story. When one world attacks another, Oona Lee, a girl who is a sand dancer, rescues two boys and the three determine to lit the unlit Beacons and save the worlds.

See the artwork from 5 Worlds on their Tumblr page here. Not fitting in and finding your place in the world never was so out of this world! Avani hates her new school and the girls in her Flower Scouts troop who talk about makeup and boys. First she discovers an old man who visits the long abandoned zoo and paints murals of the animals that used to live there.

Cici rallies her friends and family to help clean up the zoo, giving it new life. As she ends that mystery and looks for another, her friends get mad at her for her dogged focus on her own interests. Entertaining with an excellent story arc and valuable life lessons. At the hospital, the bats lively conversations help the little brown bat learn more about bats — what they eat, how they fly, different species, echolocation, and where they live.

If Ralph loses, the Earth will be destroyed. Ralph is NOT up to the challenge. Action, humor, an excellent plot, and memorable characters make this a must-read graphic novel for anyone who loves adventure. And it comes in handy, too, when the Warthogs attack Pigdom Plains. She also discovers new allies and realizes she if can stop the battle, the two peoples can build bridges of friendship.

Then I skipped to the end to see how his death was handled. All we got was Billy repeating Quien es? In the same paragraph. Facts are fine and dandy, but lacking emotion. We all know Billy is going to die, but that is no reason to make us not care if he does.


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Which is another thing that Hansen does a lot - POV jumps. We never stay in one POV. In Billy's past, we are told a lot of things that his mother is thinking, which are unimportant and takes away from The Kid. I loathe this style of writing as it creates distance from the characters you are supposed to be following. If the mother's POV is so important, then give her her own chapter. Jun 06, Eric rated it really liked it. Hansen weaves a tight historical narrative with imagined scenes and conversations to explore the central question: He was a kid.

To his credit, Hansen neither romanticizes not crucifies. What emerges through a mess of great writing and research is an enigma: Wisely, Hansen allows the reader to decide after making a strong case for either verdict. The final sentence does indeed sum it up and th Hansen weaves a tight historical narrative with imagined scenes and conversations to explore the central question: The final sentence does indeed sum it up and tho I'll not give it away, I'm confident that anyone who picks up the novel will get to it.

Fun line, attributed to Billy's buddy T. Enjoyed it less this time, tho not sure why. The poetry did not crackle as it had before, the imagery did not sink in as deeply, after Hansen's sure prose. But it did remind of this great quote, allegedly from the Kid during a jailhouse interview: He said editorials didn't do anything, they just make people feel guilty. I enjoy reading about the American West, circa late 's, and so this title was of interest to me. For the historical part of this historical fiction work, I thought the author did a pretty good job citing various well-known figures and how they came to be prominent in our Western history, and their eventual fates.

As to the fictional portions, such as the dialogue between "the Kid" and his various contacts throughout the book, they were rather entertaining, and the author painted Billy in a pr I enjoy reading about the American West, circa late 's, and so this title was of interest to me. As to the fictional portions, such as the dialogue between "the Kid" and his various contacts throughout the book, they were rather entertaining, and the author painted Billy in a pretty favorable light.

That said, I found the book somewhat disappointing as a reader-- it was slow at times, even tedious, as the structure of the chapters and writing style lacked a real cohesive thread to make the story flow and remain interesting.

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It was almost like reading a series of events from a time-line or history book, peppered with fictional dialogue, rather than a novel based on fact but still woven together by a compelling story. An average grade for the writing and structure, and a better than average grade for the personality with which the protagonist was painted. Sep 19, J. His spree of crimes and murde Born Henry McCarty, Billy the Kid was a diminutive, charming, blond-haired young man who, growing up in New York, Kansas, and later New Mexico, demonstrated a precocious dexterity at firing six-shooters with either hand—a skill that both got him into and out of trouble and that turned him into an American legend of the old West.

This having been my first Ron Hansen novel I did enjoy what story telling there was. If you have an interest in Billy the Kid I would recommend the audio book over the novel. Jun 09, Dan Downing rated it liked it. James Lee Burke, in "Robicheaux," has the eponymous character reading Hansen's book 'about the Lincoln County Wars', calling it 'the best'. In truth, not to gainsay Burke who may or may not have an opinion, the book is a fictional biography of Billy the Kid.

Like everything else associated with that diminutive name, one must wonder what is fact and what fiction. For instance, if the owl hoots and cowboys of the time were half as funny as their repartee here, no one would have been able to shot s James Lee Burke, in "Robicheaux," has the eponymous character reading Hansen's book 'about the Lincoln County Wars', calling it 'the best'.

How to Write a Novel As a Kid: 8 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow

For instance, if the owl hoots and cowboys of the time were half as funny as their repartee here, no one would have been able to shot straight for the laughing. Hansen is not a tyro, but neither does he write at an exalted level, his time at the Iowa Writer's Workshop notwithstanding. There is a Cast of Characters in the front of the book, and well there should be, as between Billy's family and the warring factions and miscellaneous characters stumbled over, the cast is large and varied. Hansen does supply follow up for the destinies of those who survive the gunplay, a touch which adds to the interest of the book.


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Jan 12, Gaylord Dold rated it it was ok. These novels are set in motion by history, but overtaken by an artistic sensibility that limns each book with both menace and delight. Each book lodges in the memory of the reader. By contrast, "The Kid" is a facile work, emotionless, slapdash and haphazardly construct The Kid by Ron Hansen Ron Hansen is the esteemed author of classics like "Desperadoes" and "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Howard", both of which loom over western historical fiction like brilliant full moons.

By contrast, "The Kid" is a facile work, emotionless, slapdash and haphazardly constructed. Hansen seems to have checked his imagination at the door. Both the real and the imaginary Billy inhabit those pages. Dec 05, Leigh rated it it was ok. I thought I could listen to this book and enjoy it more than I would if I was reading it.

I tried reading the author's book about Jesse James a few years ago and just couldn't get very far. Listening was almost as difficult. Both books read very much like textbooks, with way too many details to keep track of. I was also thrown off by the title saying it was a novel. How much was based on letters and other records?

It seemed that everything was factual based on how it was written like a text book I thought I could listen to this book and enjoy it more than I would if I was reading it. It seemed that everything was factual based on how it was written like a text book. Except for the sex scenes. I don't need to know the details of anyone's first time with a prostitute. Or any other of their possible sexual exploits. Other than those things The Kid seemed like a likable character and I liked getting to know more about him - if any of it is true.

Jul 26, Emily rated it it was ok Recommends it for: I enjoyed that this novel read more like a novel than a biography, but it was still a biography at heart. However, at some point I just got lost by it all. So many individuals were introduced who switched sides and shot bullets faster than I could keep up with. Jum I enjoyed that this novel read more like a novel than a biography, but it was still a biography at heart.

Dec 15, Brian rated it liked it. Imaginative re-creation of William Bonney's life. Though at first I was a bit put off by the brief summaries of people's lives as they exited the story because they interrupted the narrative flow, I eventually came to enjoy them. That said, my favorites are Desperadoes and Exiles. I know the Jesse James book is generally considered his best work, and while I did like it, I prefer the two mentioned just above. Mar 05, Anne Mc rated it did not like it. The book plods along with a lot of detail about locations and characters. In many ways, the plot takes a back seat to describing the characters—which include the main actors as well as all the people Billy encounters through his short life.

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OK, I thought, a historical nonfiction work needs to do this. It needs to establish where the information came from and who knew what and when, so it can give us a full, scholarly portrait of Billy Bonney. Mar 04, Rick rated it it was ok Shelves: The story is familiar, the setting is familiar, the motives and backstory of the characters familiar. Even so, there can sometimes be success in the telling of a familiar tale told if it is told well, like skilled genre writers who may be following a formula but still entertain with atmosphere, dialogue, subplots.

I suspect it works in those instances because the writers themselves are yet entertained by the genre, find pleasure in the craft of it. There is no sense of writerly pleasure in the story or place the New Mexico Territory for the most part or the occasional intersection of unexpected characters General Lew Wallace of Civil War and Ben-Hur fame or the cameo made by Jesse James. The Kid , despite its relative brevity, never gets going. Some of the dialogue clinks and clanks like the irons with which the title character periodically finds himself hobbled.

Between films and books, the Old West is as about as overworked a subset of the American experience as urban crime. This one just trots along a thin timeline of events that might as well have been pulled from an encyclopedia biography of William Bonney. Hansen clearly knows this stuff in detail, has read deeply in the literature—historic and mythic—but makes too little of that knowledge and of his own considerable skills. There is the early western work but also Marietta in Ecstasy and Atticus. Any reader would do well to read any of those works. Jul 18, Patrick Barry rated it really liked it.

Ron Hansen is an excellent writer of historical fiction. In this story he brings Billy the Kid to life. It is a story generally favorable toward The Kid, outlining his tough beginnings and generally presenting his side of the story in his altercations with the law and others. It is a good story with emphasis on story since there is not a lot of historical information to go on.

However, it is a good yarn, that shows the likely complexity of the young man as well as his villainy. Aug 11, Terry Gallagher rated it liked it. It took me a while to warm up to this, but I'm glad I stuck with it. This shares a similar amount of historical background with imaginative narration. Feb 13, Diogenes rated it really liked it. Entrancing fictional biography that makes one feel alive in the Southwest of the last part of the 19th century.

Surprisingly sympathetic to a much maligned character, known more for what deeds he didn't do than the realities of his life. As entertaining as any exceptional western.

Feb 11, Glenn Roberts rated it really liked it. Enjoyed Hansen's color commentary of the life of Billy the Kid. Of course, usually the authors of those books tend to exaggerate certain features and details in order to make the novel even more impressive, but in fact the core of truth itself makes the reading more amazing. Another extremely interesting and outstanding variation of this type of fantasy is "tsarpunk", presented in Leigh Bardugo's Grisha trilogy.

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For those who are not really familiar with this term, its author briefly describes it as 'fantasy that takes its inspiration from the aesthetics, culture, politics, and social structure of early 19th century Russia'. Basically, this book is extremely rich in all kinds of fantasy elements which are more or less common for all the other fantasy books, but what is completely outstanding and exciting is that it has a well-documented basis inspired by Tsarist Russia from Therefore it successfully combines real and unreal elements in the same place and creates a harmonized world.

In other words, when you read the book, you don't feel like you are in another world, but instead, you feel like the real one is transfigured. This feature gives to Shadow and Storm an eerie vibe which makes it a true masterpiece of this genre. There is certainly no such thing as a perfect recipe for a good fantasy novel, and it is clear that both of those two types of fantasy books are interesting to different sorts of people.

Different readers seek totally different things in a book and see them from different perspectives, but both can be equally gripping. Which do you prefer, and why? Does Shadow and Bone perfectly combine the two?