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Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. After Gwartney and her husband— two people who Buy Live Through This: A Mother's Memoir of Runaway Daughters and Reclaimed Love: Read 40 Kindle Store Reviews - efycymepodor.tk
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  1. Revelations of an Ideological Philosopher?
  2. (Bild-) Journalismus - Ein systemtheoretischer Diskurs (German Edition);
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She's made arguments for both sides, leaving us with a final vision of a healing and growing family. The book ends on a wonderful last line, where daughter Amanda recounts the advice given by her mother as she delivered her newborn: Whether you believe you'd have done the same under the circumstances, you're hard-pressed to deny that fact.

This level of truthfulness and clarity is only achieved through writing this humble and honest. This book is a work of bravery and persistence, and I deeply admire it. Debra Gwartney's memorable and beautifully written first book tells the harrowing, page-turning story of her two oldest daugthers' both teenagers , many months' absence from their home in the mids. Gwartney does not try to excuse the mistakes that she believed she made in the years that followed her divorce from her four daughters' father and the subsequent move north to Oregon from Arizona.

This is a clear-eyed, sympathetic portrait of a mother's and her four daughters' difficult period of growth, and each page is characterized by Gwartney's immense intelligence. One person found this helpful. I was compelled by it. To reconsider daughters and mothers I have one. Gwartey is at the same time so specific in her pursuit of the emotional life that whirls around the details.

The shifty resources we have to make sense of the two. Resilience, the body itself clenching like a fist. Her journey into the tenderloin rremnds me of Dante's forest. Anyone who has heard this drumming, read "Get Through This. Then leave it around for your children. I wish this were a borrowed library book instead of one I purchased.

This was a very hard read not just because of the subject matter but because the author is a very unsympathetic woman. The two girls were out of control brats, but why? I feel that most of what happened did so because of the mother. I had a difficult time finishing the book and did so only because I wanted to know if Amanda and Stephanie were able to create better lives for themselves. Except for the last few pages this book was very depressing. I would not recommend it. I could'nt put this book down! As the mother of a daughter the same age as these girls, I just could not even begin to imagine!

The big unanswerd question the reader is left with is WHY! Why did they do it. As a man in my teens when I read this book, all I can say is that it gave me great perspective from women, mothers and teen girls alike. Absolutely riveting, terrifying and a true American family story. See all 40 reviews. Most recent customer reviews. Published 11 months ago. Published 1 year ago. Published on March 15, Published on December 9, Published on December 18, Published on November 27, Published on August 20, I couldn't put it down.

Published on March 14, Published on July 16, Published on March 2, There's a problem loading this menu right now. Get fast, free shipping with Amazon Prime. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations. View or edit your browsing history. Get to Know Us. English Choose a language for shopping. Being in recovery myself, I identified with the drug use, but I always wanted a warm place to sleep. I identified with Debra Gwartney never giving up on her children, but them always pushing her away.

I loved this book and will be thinking about it for years to come. Belinya sih bereng silver Phonix, tp baru ingat belum dibaca. Setelah membaca setidaknya bisa memahami banyak hal tentang kasih sayang seorang ibu. Walau kadang menjengkelkan menurut kita, namun seorang ibu pasti ingin yang terbaik untuk anaknya. Memang tidak bisa dipungkiri cara yang dipilih untuk menunjukkan kasih sayangnya kadang malah menjengkelkan bagi seorang anak.

Live Through This A Mothers Memoir of Runaway Daughters and Reclaimed Love Books

Seorang ibu akan dianggap cerewet jika berulang kali mengingatkan anaknya untuk sejenak berhenti beraktifitas dan menyegerakan ma Belinya sih bereng silver Phonix, tp baru ingat belum dibaca. Seorang ibu akan dianggap cerewet jika berulang kali mengingatkan anaknya untuk sejenak berhenti beraktifitas dan menyegerakan makan, atau mengingatkan membawa payung saat cuaca terlihat mendung.

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Bahkan sang ibu juga yang harus tertunduk malu jika mengambil raport sang anak yang isinya di bawah rata-rata. Namun, sang ibu adalah orang yang tersenyum paling lebar saat buah hatinya naik kelas, berfoto saat wisuda bahkan saat sang anak membeli kendaraan pertamanya Pepatah yang berkata kasih ibu sepanjang masa sepertinya memang benar May 09, Shawna rated it really liked it. A good read, but as always with this type of book like "Augusta Gone" I tend to get angry at the behavior of the children and be amazed at how much abuse the mother will put up with.

Debra also puts out a lot of money to force her daughters into a variety of alternative programs in the hopes of changing their behavior. I wonder what a person is supposed to do who doesn't have well-off parents, or rich former in-laws, or a variety of friends who'll step in and take the girls off her hands. Also A good read, but as always with this type of book like "Augusta Gone" I tend to get angry at the behavior of the children and be amazed at how much abuse the mother will put up with.

Also, since I was a younger daughter in a family where my older sister was behaving a lot like the girls in this book, I have a lot of empathy for the younger sisters in this story, who seem to be forgotten in the midst of their sisters' storm.

Dec 22, Ryan Mishap rated it it was ok Shelves: Having been a punk for so long, I've met many the traveler, run-away, and escapee from dysfunctional families and cultures. I've read their zines and heard their songs, so I wondered what it might be like for the families they left behind. I was hoping to get a good perspective on that from this memoir, but I can't finish.

Like with personal zines, it is hard to know whether one should review the writing or the person. I'm sure this has a fine ending and everything is okay now, but this memoir wa Having been a punk for so long, I've met many the traveler, run-away, and escapee from dysfunctional families and cultures. I'm sure this has a fine ending and everything is okay now, but this memoir was too contained in its own story so that I never got a sense of connection with the larger world. Perhaps that is a re-creation of how it felt at the time and "each family is unhappy in its own way.

Feb 17, Brandi Declue rated it it was amazing. I was sucked in to this book and am still trying to recover. As a mother, it was a frightening book for me to read. This memoir actually made me get teary-eyed in a few spots, as well as mad. Mad at the author, mad at the ex-husband, mad at the daughters. I guess you could say there were a lot of emotions to deal with and that is part of the reason why I enjoyed it so much.

There are some heavy moments in this book where Gwartney implicates herself and I admire that I have already t WOW! I have already told some of my friends, especially the mothers, to read this book. It wouldn't be a bad idea for a teenage girl or two to reader either. Oct 07, Renee rated it really liked it. A harrowing tale written by a mother whose two eldest daughters chose life on the streets at a very young age 12 and What Debra Gwartney went through to get her daughters back home and safe is both exhausting and admirable.

However, it is pretty clear that the fighting and public show of contempt that she and her ex-husband displayed was a large factor that caused these angry girls to jump ship in the first place. I listened to this book on audio and it was well done. Aug 13, Zoe rated it really liked it Shelves: Like many others, I found that I wasn't able to put this book down. What I admired most was Gwartney's willingness to make herself an unlikable character and to admit her faults without coming across as whiny or self-pitying.

I loved the scene where she was in the counselor's office with her ex-husband and his wife after her daughter attempted suicide, and they get into a terrible fight and the counselor says, "If I were your daughter, I'd want to kill myself, too. Apr 15, S rated it did not like it. I'm angry that I finished this book.. Let's see, how can I put this kindly? I almost want to find her and give her a good slap, not the sexual kind either. Apr 01, TheSaint rated it really liked it Shelves: It was eye-opening to have a more fleshed out view of the horrors of young teen runaways on the remaining family.

The NPR story also gave the viewpoints of the two sisters, but I can't help but want to read their own full accounts of their lives on the road. Apr 02, Elizabeth rated it liked it Shelves: Smartly written account about every parents worst nightmare- losing your child or in this case children. On Page 57, Gwartney poses the question that comes one day for the best of parents: Sep 25, Dorianne Laux rated it it was amazing.

Harrowing story of motherhood by a writer who's been there. Finalist for the Oregon Book Award. If you're a mother, you need to read this book. View all 5 comments. Jun 08, Purl Scout rated it did not like it. Yahhh cinta Ibu itu begitu luas, walaupun kita terkadang tidak menyadarinya atau tidak merasakanya View all 13 comments. May 15, Isabelle King rated it really liked it. Live Through This is by Debra Gwartney. Debra is in her last year of college when she meets a man that she ends up getting married to just after college. They have four kids Amanda, Stephanie, Mary, and Mollie.

After a divorce Debra moves to a different state with her daughters. At first everything is pretty decent, but then problems start with the oldest daughter Amanda. One day she stops showing up to school, and she starts influencing the second oldest, Stephanie, to come with her. Not soon after more and more problems start popping up. Then one day they stop coming home, and start living on the streets. It made me wonder when the story would start back up. This writing style in a memoir. Oct 19, Brandy rated it liked it. I want to start out this response by saying that I lost my daughter this year-- but I can't, because she's still alive, and I blessedly don't have to face that horror.

Perhaps I could say that my daughter has gone missing--but I know, more or less, where she is, and more importantly, that she is safe and cared for. I could fall back on the Hollywood cliche of "my daughter is lost to me. I can't I want to start out this response by saying that I lost my daughter this year-- but I can't, because she's still alive, and I blessedly don't have to face that horror.

I can't even clarify or say too much about it in a public forum without feeling as though I'm betraying her trust. The bones of the matter are this: Realizing that an active imagination is a bad thing to have when there are ominous vibes in the air between myself and someone I love, I asked her to put my mind at ease and answer a few questions. She wasn't dropping out of school. Was she moving out? The answer she gave me was silence. As far as I can recall, that was the last phone conversation I had with her, ten months ago now.

She's texted me sporadically, usually confrontationally, and we've seen each other a couple of times in her therapist's office. Her father picks up her things when I've packed enough boxes to fill a closet. Up until last year--or, let's be generous and say up until she was fifteen and our relationship started to fray--we were constant companions. We shared many of the same interests and quirks, tastes, fandoms, and jokes. I still think she's one of the most amazing people I've ever known, and the hole she has left in my life is beyond description.

A Mother's Memoir Of Runaway Daughters : NPR

But she has been in so much pain these last few years. Her struggles have grown over time, and have left me watching helplessly more than once. This isn't the place to go into what I think the reasons are for her withdrawal from me, or to place blame, or puzzle through the psychology of it. I want to instead turn my attention to Debra Gwartney's book about her own relationship with her teenaged daughters, Live Through This. I can't talk about this book and its significance to me without name dropping, of a sort.

After my daughter cut ties and the first wave of grief had passed over me, I thought of an essay I'd read some years ago by Debra Gwartney. I have no idea if she remembers me. She was, though, kind to both me and my daughter, who went through preschool and kindergarten while I was in grad school. Gwartney had some sort of Rugrats decal on her iMac which my daughter adored; the two of them would occasionally conspire together in Gwartney's office while I attended to things which needed attending to in the neighboring office.

I sometimes talked to Gwartney about her daughters, and she told me a little about the struggles they had gone through. I knew enough to seek out her essay published in a literary journal on the topic, and to feel a start of familiarity when her story was played on This American Life.

The essay and radio piece were the first passages of Live Through This to receive public attention. Essentially, this book is a memoir of a problematic motherhood. It tells the story of Gwartney and her two oldest daughters, Stephanie and Amanda, trying to navigate some serious teenage drama, involving divorce, alienation, self-harm, substance abuse, and, eventually, the choice the girls made to live in the West Coast street culture.

Most fiercely, though, it tells the story of Gwartney's attempts to wrestle with the idea of what it meant to be a good mother. Her daughters were hurt by their parents' youthful selfishness, yes, but they also refused her repeated attempts to help them, to give them other options, to protect them from their own worst decisions. Only after years of false starts and broken communication did the family begin the slow and painful process of reuniting. Gwartney never portrays herself as a saint. If she had, this book wouldn't have borne the attention it drew from a number of quarters.

Instead, as many of the reviews point out, she is sharply honest both about her daughters' actions and the role she played in them. Gwartney made mistakes, trying too hard at some points and succumbing to the weariness of the struggle at others. Her depiction of her daughters during that time in their lives is unflinching, neither softened by nostalgia nor crystallized with resentment.

She is also honest in her account of her own longing, her feelings of failure, her jealousy towards "normal" families, and the changing faces of her love for her daughters. In other words, she portrays herself and her daughters as human. When I think of Debra Gwartney at the U of O, I think of a woman who always struck me as kind, thoughtful, generous, efficient, and effective.

Simply put, she had it together. I sought out Live Through This last spring because I wanted to understand how things could go so badly for a mother who was clearly capable, who cared and had resources and loved and, well, was a good mother, by my standards anyway. I know I was seeking confirmation a book couldn't give me. The truth is, no one can. The loss, in any form, of a child is the familiar terror which keeps new parents up at night.

As the children grow older, we grow more complacent, certain that we've skated around that edge. But most of us never consider that the biggest threat to our children is, sometimes, themselves. We're supposed to teach them better, to love them so much that their faith in themselves doesn't wane because they know our own faith in them will bolster it. Or we're supposed to be the superheroes, which becomes problematic when they don't want saving. A mother in particular is supposed to subsume her identity in her child's, or so everything around us seems to proclaim.

And that, so the myth goes, will be enough. It will be enough to make our children happy and healthy. It will give them connection and purpose.

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However, Gwartney's daughters are hardly the first who have busted this myth, and they won't be the last. Gwartney herself won't be the last mother to make errors that lead her astray of the cultural script, and she doesn't seem to have found herself defined by the mistakes she did make. Maybe I won't be, either.

Live Through This: A Mother's Memoir of Runaway Daughters and Reclaimed Love

A very gripping memoir about an unexpected outcome for two otherwise well-adjusted daughters. Raises all kinds of questions about parenting teenagers: What could the parent s have done differently? How does this get repaired, if ever? Where does a parent's will end and the child's begin? How and when do we let go and allow our children to experience the unsafe reality of the world? Even the best kid can end up choosing to live in chaos.

Sometimes I was frustrated at the mother A very gripping memoir about an unexpected outcome for two otherwise well-adjusted daughters. Sometimes I was frustrated at the mother but felt her primal desperation to get her kids back. I wanted to throttle the kids, thinking "If that's your choice to go live on the street, sayonara. Good luck, kid, and there will be NO coming home to do laundry or scrounge for money Compound this with the life sentence of an absolutely toxic ex-spouse and it's a wonder this woman can hold it together as much as she does. Recommended for parents of or people who are close with teenagers.

Nov 14, Kristen rated it really liked it. After a nasty divorce, Gwartney's daughters dress in black cloth and dog collars and start the grand sport of running away. They're only twelve and fourteen, if I remember right. They have no use for their mother, except when life on the street finally exhausts all their resources and they come home to raid the pantry and the dresser drawers, then head out again to the world of drugs and confused kids.

Gwartney is a concerned mother, but she's also an interfering and enabling one. You wouldn't w After a nasty divorce, Gwartney's daughters dress in black cloth and dog collars and start the grand sport of running away. You wouldn't want to live her story, but it makes for some pretty good reading. Aku hampir mati bosen pas baca bagian di mana si mom ini ga bisa ngatur anak-anak perempuannya yang super bandel. Tapi berkat perjuangan dan kemauan keras untuk menamatkan setiap buku yang saya baca, akhirnya selesai juga.

May 31, Abby rated it really liked it.