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Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. In the dramatic third and almost certainly God of Clocks (Deepgate Codex Book 3) - Kindle edition by Alan Campbell. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.
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They are either the lifeform, of sorts, a person takes in hell or they can be cooked! Or person food, apparently, if you can get your hands on some.

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This whole thing was disturbing to me, and everytime anybody consumed soul pearls or similar, I couldn't help but consider it somewhat cannibalistic. Or the new beginning. Or really lack of either. How do we reach a conclusion on a rambling disjointed tale like this? Well, we've already introduced time travel so why not just travel all the way back to the beginning of time, pick up god's mother and start over from the beginning.

Because she's grown lonely in the meantime. Do the supposedly good guys get any sort of victory? Are the bad guys dealt with at all? Does that mean the bad guys achieve a victory, then? Are all lose ends tied up neatly? Does this book actually have an ending at all? Even if for a large part of it that was through sheer stubbornness. For the series as a whole, I enjoyed the first book. The second had me confused and the third was even worse.

The disjointed rambling nature or the last two makes them feel rushed. As if they try to cover way more content than there is really room for in the pages. I think the first book would have been better off as a standalone. Feb 15, Hanzel rated it liked it. I want to say something nice, but all I get is me scratching my head at this, it's supposed to be the 3rd book where all my questions are to be answered, and yet it irks me, ummmmm my ebook says pages, but the one in goodreads says , so I maybe just maybe, there were some resolutions from the missing pages.

God of Clocks picks up soon after Iron Angel leaves off. It doesn't really add much that's new, though the battle continues, and some of the mysteries are revealed. I'm sorry to say that it's only some. Campbell wove in a number of intriguing threads in books 1 and 2. He leaves quite a lot of them loose in this third volume. There are two other books in this universe, Lye Street and Damnation for Beginners , but they appear to be relatively free standing.

With that, I'd have to count this closing book of the trilogy as a disappointment. Where Iron Angel fulfilled its promise in unexpected ways, this book does not. It moves the story forward, but deteriorates at the end into a not very satisfying dead end. God of Clocks, after all. As most time travel efforts do, even in defter hands, this ends with a whimper.

Campbell pulls of a slight variation of the time travel standards, but only a slight one. And it ends poorly - more a colorful plot mechanism than credible narrative. I'd sum up this trilogy as interesting and innovative, but hampered by occasionally inadequate description, and brought down by a substandard ending. I can recommend the first book, Scar Night as a interesting read, but I'd stop there. You could even stop after book 2, Iron Angel.


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But in my view, this third book will frustrate and disappoint you. May 19, Kenci rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Fans of dark, grimy, Gothic fantasy.


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  5. Fans of Scott Lynch, George R. This thrilling saga is consistently anything but predictable or mundane. It is a madcap tumble through bizarre, lunatic landscapes. Just when you think you know what is coming, guess again! God of Clocks picks up where Iron Angel left off and sets off at a madcap pace into what should have been a brilliant conclusion to an incredible trilogy. The ending, unfortunately, felt very rushed. It was building to this amazing climax and then it was…over. More questions were left unanswered than answered.

    Plus a whole new set of questions came up! I truly hope that Alan Campbell is not through with these characters and this world. Like Martin and Lynch, Campbell is not afraid to kill off main characters… although they do not always stay dead … This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I quite liked the way this ended, although I suspect a lot of people won't. I still think the series were lacking in some things, from large-ish things, for example the consequences of the Angelwine were never really explained, to small inconsistencies: I was convinced Rachael was described as dark haired in my copy of Scar Night, and in God of Clocks she's a pale blonde.

    It might be me misremembering, or me having first editions of book 1 and 3, which might've contained mistakes that were fixed in later editions, but still things that are a little bit puzzling. Thankfully there's a lot less Dill and a lot more Carnival in God of Clocks than in Iron Angel, and the setting is certainly different, as was the ending, where it went a bit more SF than fantasy at times, even if it very predictably ended with the opening of Heaven.

    Aug 09, Brett rated it did not like it. I was initially somewhat disappointed by "Scar Night", but had my hopes lifted with "Iron Angel", which I thought was really well-written. Unfortunately, I feel that "God of Clocks", while presenting some intriguing ideas I like Campbell's vision of Hell, and his perception of Time and its ability to be manipulated , fails to deliver when it matters most - at the end. Instead we are left with a series of tableaus rather than answers. Until then, I'd have to give this a pass. May 21, Ricky rated it liked it.

    What the fuck happened here? I really loved this series.

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    It was new and refreshing, there was no sense of formulaic plot development and I was engaged in the books wondering what would happen next. But, the end of book 3 in the series feels premature. That's it, game over, go home folks. It's like watching a football game, you're getting down the wire, the score is tied and you've got 2 minutes left to go.

    Then suddenly the ref steps out onto the field, one of the teams is What the fuck happened here? Then suddenly the ref steps out onto the field, one of the teams is gone and everyone's packing up and leaving. Jul 24, Zen rated it did not like it Shelves: The third of a series, this is the most boring book of the three. All the spark of the first book, Scar Night, is gone.

    And the intrigue that kept me going through the second book is just smashed into incoherence here. I feel like my own writing is suffering from reading this book Read Scar Night and Lye Street as a duo instead of wasting time on this book or its' predecessor. Well, this was a little better than the middle novel. The story continues to plod along to the end. A lot of threads left unfinished or unanswered. The temporal anomalies and time travel aspect added a bit of interest. I liked the final lines. Disappointing to see a trilogy start out so well and then literally crash and burn in the successive installments.

    Dec 17, Adam Whitehead rated it it was ok. Twelve powerful arconites walk the earth, preparing to bring about the destruction of humanity and bringing its souls under the command of Menoa, Lord of Hell. Ahead of their advance, assassin Rachel Hale, blood-witch Mina Greene, the angel Dill and the god Hasp retreat towards the castle of Sabor, god of clocks. Meanwhile, Cospinol, god of brine, decides that he must mount a direct assault on Menoa and orders his slave-champion, John Anchor, to pull him and his immense vessel into Hell, for a v Twelve powerful arconites walk the earth, preparing to bring about the destruction of humanity and bringing its souls under the command of Menoa, Lord of Hell.

    Meanwhile, Cospinol, god of brine, decides that he must mount a direct assault on Menoa and orders his slave-champion, John Anchor, to pull him and his immense vessel into Hell, for a very strange voyage indeed God of Clocks is the final volume of The Deepgate Codex possibly the most misnamed trilogy ever: It picks up after the cliffhanger ending to the second volume and expectations were for a big, epic climax.

    Instead, we get something different. This is an odd book. Campbell's grasp of character and plot remains strong, and the revelations of backstory mysteries are mostly effective. But there are long diversions and side-plots that ultimately don't seem to go anywhere. The introduction of time travel is intriguing - fantasy typically doesn't touch it with a bargepole - and there's a lot of humour going on, but ultimately the narrative becomes confused and self-destructs towards the end.

    Time travel is often used as a get-out clause for lazy writers, something I'd never have pegged Campbell as based on the strength of his first two novels , but here it fulfils its all-too tempting deus ex machina, narrative-crutch role. Simply put, the revelation that there are billions of alternate timelines in which every possibility is played out does make the reader wonder why he should be caring about this particular timeline and story. Even worse is the danger that time travel can be used to undo all the events of the story so far, meaning that the losses and prices that our heroes have paid are simply wished out of existence.

    Whilst the ending doesn't quite go that far it's ambiguous what does get changed and what doesn't , it's still a bit of a cheat. There's enough interesting characters and ideas here for the book to be worth reading, but ultimately this is a trilogy that does not deliver on what it promised in the first book. May 05, Erin Penn rated it really liked it. I started with the third book of the Deepgate Codex three-book epic fantasy series, and it works fine as a stand-alone, dumping the reader in the middle of the action.

    It takes a little while to sort everything out, but no different than the standard dumping a reader in the middle of the action one finds in urban fantasy. With no "recaps" things keep moving at a breathtaking pace, keeping me reading for eight straight hours beginning to end. The world-building is a creepy Guillermo del Toro fever I started with the third book of the Deepgate Codex three-book epic fantasy series, and it works fine as a stand-alone, dumping the reader in the middle of the action.

    The world-building is a creepy Guillermo del Toro feverish dream; Deepgate Codex is unrelentingly dark, horrific place because of the war between gods bleeding onto the firmament of the planet as well as Heaven and Hell. None of the characters are white hats, or even gray, the "heroes" of this multiple point-of-view story are nightmares in-and-of themselves.

    The nicest of the group are one an assassin who starts the story by watching a massacre masquerading as a battle while she eats an picnic and two a trapped angel in a mech-suit who accidentally kills people while walking. Really, throughout the story, I never knew which side to root for - the bad guys protagonists or the worse guys antagonists. Several of the protagonists eat souls for power; even the puppy is demonic. There is no one to actually like in this book. Which is why, even with the amazingly visceral world-building you can see, smell, and taste this world ; and characters who are unique with different goals, motivations, and flaws; I can't give the book five stars.

    I read the book straight through because I knew if I put it down, I would never pick it up again. Note that, as the title of "God of Clocks" implies, time travel kicks in during the book toward the end - causing paradoxes, splinter universes, and other time mechanisms.

    Time paradox combining with being Epic Fantasy and dark-dark-for-the-sake-of-dark, this book manages to hit many of my "dislike" buttons.

    God of Clocks

    But I don't feel I can mark it down just for being what it is - the blurb clearly indicates none of the characters are nice people and the title promises something with time. Still, not having any characters to like - except for one little demon who happens to be the first POV character - not having any characters to root for, care for, to pick up the book again to finish their story for Not going to ever re-read this one. I would have rated this with four stars, but to be honest the biggest disappointment was the ending of the book AND the series ; it seemed as if the author simply could not figure out a way to tie up all the loose ends so he just gives us what appears here.

    I quite enjoyed this one although it has been a really long time since I read the other two books in the series so I didn't remember as much as I would have liked.

    God of Clocks (Deepgate Codex, book 3) by Alan Campbell

    I found this book to be really fast paced and I just couldn't stop reading so I managed to read it in a couple of sittings. Multiple, oh so many narrative threads left fucking dangling for Ulcis to gum on for the rest of goddamned eternity! How very dare you, Mr Campbell?! Just, how dare you? Sep 17, Omer Vertman rated it liked it. Aug 29, Lauren rated it it was amazing. This series was fantastic. Very original and different from anything else that I've ever read.

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    I wasn't totally thrilled with how this one ended, but all in all just awesome. Ci sono dei, semidei, angeli con le ali, robot meccanici giganteschi ed invincibili, oltre a tante persone comuni, le cui anime sono reali e concrete, soffrono veramente "le pene dell'Inferno", e possono anche essere mangiate per rinvigorirsi. Ci sono sicuramente aspetti estremamente positivi anche in questo finale, specialmente la parte che si svolge nell'Inferno in cui Carnival ritrova un ruolo di protagonista, ed anche in parte nella fuga di Dill, divenuto ormai un arconte inseguito dai suoi pari, aiutato ma non si sa fino a quando dal dio Hasp, costretto ad ubbidire ai comandi del fratellastro Menoa, ma il gioco temporale del dio degli orologi, l'intrico di multiuniversi che ne deriva, lasciano la storia senza una vera conclusione.

    Il finale credo sia la parte peggiore di questa triologia, che ritengo debba essere letta sopratutto e forse solamente per il suo primo capitolo. Nov 13, Tiffany Cole rated it really liked it. In the mystical, ancient city of Deepgate, deities and iron angels battle, while an opened portal to hell lets loose creatures that further destroy the land and its inhabitants. Sounds like the end While readers dwell on that, the cast of protagonists are introduced together before they separate into two intermingling adventures.

    John Archer leads his group through hell. Get ready for an adventure that combines realistic characters with inhuman creatures and comedy with serious situations, an adventure with paradoxes, angels, gods and demons beautifully interwoven in a world like and unlike our own.

    When readers start to believe that everything will go right, that all the characters will participate, Alan Campbell proves them wrong. I opened this book with the idea that I'd be reading a dark urban fantasy. The words hell, legions, creatures and angels certainly calls for such an assumption.

    What with all the intricate world building and otherworld terminology, I learned the story was more fantasy than dark urban. That doesn't mean Alan fails to deliver, though! I hope so, because you'll regret it if you can't. Cole, and I'm a book reviewer for Suspense Magazine.

    I am also an aspiring young writer. You can find me in many places: Dec 23, James rated it really liked it Shelves: I read the two preceding books about a year ago, and finally picked up the conluding novel in the series. This book started off at 4 stars, sagged down to 3, then rose sharply to 5 stars for the entire second half, then settled at an overall 4 stars for me by the end. This is a "dark" fantasy, which basically means that each of the characters have a touch of "bad" in them.

    This isn't overly done, so I was still able to attach myself to various characters, but in the end, you're alright if any of I read the two preceding books about a year ago, and finally picked up the conluding novel in the series. This isn't overly done, so I was still able to attach myself to various characters, but in the end, you're alright if any of them gets what's coming to them not that any of them do, which was strangely disappointing.

    The tone of this book and the preceding ones is also appropriate, given that this is a world where Heaven has been sealed shut and angels cast down to earth. The book involves two groups of characters as they both try their solutions to preventing Hell from taking over completely. One goes down under to fight the king of Hell himself, while the other takes the opposite route and decides to try to storm the now closed gates of Heaven. Through in a little very well done time travel and you've got yourself a pretty entertaining novel.

    The majority of the book was really good, but there were a few slow moments near the beginning and the ending was not completely satisfactory. It's one of those books where you're getting near the end and you suddenly realize there's only 10 pages left and absolutely no way that the author is going to pull this off. Still, the ending wasn't a complete waste, it just had so much more potential than was realized. A little more clarification about what was actually going on at the end might have been beneficial as well. Overall, I thought the series as a whole averaged 4 stars and was worth reading for anyone who can let themselves enjoy a "dark" fantasy novel.

    Not everyone can, it's hard when there's more gray, and less black and white. I'm bit torn between rating this book 2 or 3 stars, but it's leaning closer to 3 stars so I'm going to let it stay on that. This may be a review for all three of the books and not just God of Clocks.

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    I have mixed feeling for this whole series. At parts i found myself bored, but at other i forgot i was reading and just raced through the pages. It started sort of good with the first book, i got out of my reading slump, but there's that. Plotwise the first book may be my favourite of these three.

    Wi I'm bit torn between rating this book 2 or 3 stars, but it's leaning closer to 3 stars so I'm going to let it stay on that. With the second book i felt not much happened. God of Clocks turned out well, but with all the time travel and universe cracks it started to feel like a mess.

    I also felt the ending was not very satisfying. I wanted to know more what happened later. So the leaning towards 2 stars is because the timey wimey mess and the ending. In whole, I really like Campbell's worldbuilding; i love the concept of a City being supported on chains and the layout of Hell is really fascinating. But, i did have issues with some plot descriptions and some issues with the character writing.

    I never felt too close with any of the characters. The only one i genuinely rooted for was Dill. Some of the other's like Mina, Rachel and Carnival i liked. The rest i couldn't care less for. In the first book i would have wanted to see a more deep development of Dill and Rachel's friendship, where they went from reluctant and really disliking each other to, for several reasons, bonding. The war with the hellish Mesmerist hordes of King Menoa, Lord of the Maze, and the sons of the goddess Ayen continues while our litle band of rebels from Deepgate is caught between.

    Spine assassin Rachel Hael is reunited with the angel Dill, whose soul controls a foot tall mechanical Archonite. Along with the thaumaturge Mina Greene, her little demon dog Basilis and the god Hasp, they are pursued by 12 more mesmerist-controlled Archonites as they try to reach the castle of Sabor, God of Clock The war with the hellish Mesmerist hordes of King Menoa, Lord of the Maze, and the sons of the goddess Ayen continues while our litle band of rebels from Deepgate is caught between.

    Along with the thaumaturge Mina Greene, her little demon dog Basilis and the god Hasp, they are pursued by 12 more mesmerist-controlled Archonites as they try to reach the castle of Sabor, God of Clocks, in order to find a way to defeat Menoa. Campbell again shows us that his imagination is indeed rich and you'll meet a plethora of beings both living and dead here as well as some pretty mind-bending concepts involving the effects of time travel. I have to say I like this better than Iron Angel, although the ending seemed a bit weak, as it seems to flow a little more solidly - at least until we start jumping back and forth in time.

    Much was left untied-up at the end so maybe there'll be another book. Jun 20, Pavlo Tverdokhlib rated it it was ok Shelves: Ok, there's no way to sugarcoat it: Campbell doesn't stick the ending. Basically, the same problems that became evident in "Iron Angel" are present here- the author allowed the scope of the story to overwhelm him.

    Campbell clearly has a great and vivid imagination. He comes up with some really cool concepts. Unfortunately, he can't fit his story around them well. Using this method makes Campbell's work feel very Deus Ex Machina-y, and the ending especially so. It fits what has been said before, but it still feels kind of like a cop-out.

    Overall, it's not the worst ending I've read: But it does feel weak and all over the place at times. So so so disappointed in the end. The epilogue was about Harper??? One of the characters I cared least about gets the final words. What happened to Rachel? Was the battle in hell they were waging all pointless since they got back in time to bring Ayen out from Heaven? This whole series had so much potential, but too often, plots and characters were thrown away and wasted.

    Carnival was the most interesting character of the lot and in the end she turns into some mil So so so disappointed in the end. Carnival was the most interesting character of the lot and in the end she turns into some mildly rebellious angel that the church is using? So Rachel 'helps' guide Ayen, apparently. But with all that timeline altering, how would it be possible for her even to be born? And what of Dill? He was an angel ghost and they weren't sure how long he could hold that non-corporeal form.

    How long did he last? And then where did he go? Was there even a hell anymore? Nov 20, Brent Hayward rated it it was ok. Klantrecensies Er zijn nog geen klantenrecensies. Deel je gedachten met andere klanten. Nuttigste klantenrecensies op Amazon. It doesn't really add much that's new, though the battle continues, and some of the mysteries are revealed. I'm sorry to say that it's only some. Campbell wove in a number of intriguing threads in books 1 and 2. He leaves quite a lot of them loose in this third volume. With that, I'd have to count this closing book of the trilogy as a disappointment.

    Where Iron Angel fulfilled its promise in unexpected ways, this book does not. It moves the story forward, but deteriorates at the end into a not very satisfying dead end. God of Clocks, after all. As most time travel efforts do, even in defter hands, this ends with a whimper. Campbell pulls of a slight variation of the time travel standards, but only a slight one. And it ends poorly - more a colorful plot mechanism than credible narrative. I'd sum up this trilogy as interesting and innovative, but hampered by occasionally inadequate description, and brought down by a substandard ending.

    You could even stop after book 2, Iron Angel. But in my view, this third book will frustrate and disappoint you. I really liked this over all series. I read Scar Night ages ago and didn't even know Campbell had written sequels. He's a good author and his descriptions of this crazy world are amazing. Love a number of the characters, especially the likes of John Anchor.

    What I didn't like was the weird plot twist this took at the end, here in God of Clocks. The title says it all, really. Not sure why Campbell choose to take this direction, considering how the first two books where laid out. Still, it's a good read. His writing style is solid and his characters fun and unique.